Trucker who caused Broncos crash likely to be deported after sentence: lawyer

An immigration lawyer says the truck driver who caused the deadly Humboldt Broncos bus crash in Saskatchewan is likely to be deported to India right after he serves his sentence.

Lorne Waldman, who is based in Toronto and is not involved in the case, says there’s little 30-year-old Jaskirat Singh Sidhu, of Calgary, can do to remain in Canada.

Waldman says permanent residents such as Sidhu cannot remain in the country if they commit a crime for which the maximum sentence is at least 10 years or their jail sentence is more than six months.

And he says that with a term of more than six months, there’s no right to appeal a deportation order.

Sidhu is to be sentenced today in Melfort, Sask., for dangerous driving after pleading guilty in January.

His transport truck barreled through a stop sign and into the path of the junior hockey team’s bus last April. The ensuing crash killed 16 people and injured 13 others.

He admitted to 16 counts of dangerous driving causing death and 13 counts of dangerous driving causing bodily harm —which under the law at the time carry maximum terms of 14 years and 10 years.

It was such a serious offence, and the consequences were so great, that I would think it would be hard for him to be successful in convincing someone not to proceed with a deportation process against him.– Immigration lawyer Lorne Waldman

The Crown has asked that Sidhu serve 10 years in prison and the defence has argued that past cases suggest a range of 1 ½ to 4 ½ years.

Sidhu’s sentencing hearing heard that his girlfriend immigrated to Toronto in 2013 and he followed her shortly after. The pair were students and moved to Calgary.

In January 2018, the couple travelled back to India and were married Feb. 15. They returned to Canada in March. Three weeks before the crash, he was hired by a small Calgary trucking company.

Waldman said Sidhu would have the right to make a submission to immigration authorities explaining his situation before deportation proceedings were to begin — but it would be a long shot.

“The facts of this case are extremely sympathetic if it were not for the horrible consequences of what happened. It was a one-time lapse — no drinking, no other criminal offences,” he said.

“But it was such a serious offence, and the consequences were so great, that I would think it would be hard for him to be successful in convincing someone not to proceed with a deportation process against him.”

Waldman said immigration authorities usually visit offenders in jail, where they’re informed they are inadmissible to stay in Canada, that a report has been written and that they have three weeks to send submissions.

“Immigration authorities will not wait. They’ll probably start the deportation process relatively quickly,” Waldman said.

But a deportation order isn’t acted upon until an offender is released.

Such offenders are banned from ever returning to Canada unless they can persuade authorities when reapplying that theirs is a special humanitarian case.



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Sherwood Park

Sherwood Park is a large hamlet in Alberta, Canada within Strathcona County that is recognized as an urban service area.[7] It is located adjacent to the City of Edmonton’s eastern boundary,[8] generally south of Highway 16 (Yellowhead Trail), west of Highway 21 and north of Highway 630 (Wye Road).[9] Other portions of Sherwood Park extend beyond Yellowhead Trail and Wye Road, while Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) separates Refinery Row to the west from the balance of the hamlet to the east.[9]

Sherwood Park was established in 1955 on farmland of the Smeltzer family, east of Edmonton. With a population of 70,618 in 2016,[6] Sherwood Park has enough people to be Alberta’s seventh largest city, but technically retains the status of a hamlet. The Government of Alberta recognizes the Sherwood Park Urban Service Area as equivalent to a city.

History

Sherwood Park, originally named Campbelltown, was founded by John Hook Campbell and John Mitchell in 1953 when the Municipal District of Strathcona No. 83 approved their proposed development of a bedroom community east of Edmonton. The first homes within the community were marketed to the public in 1955. Canada Post intervened on the name of Campbelltown due to the existence of several other communities in Canada within the same name, so the community’s name was changed to Sherwood Park in 1956.
Geography

The Sherwood Park Urban Service Area is located in the Edmonton Capital Region along the western edge of central Strathcona County adjacent to the City of Edmonton.[8] The majority of the community is bound by Highway 16 (Yellowhead Highway) to the north, Highway 21 to the east, Highway 630 (Wye Road) to the south, and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the west. The Refinery Row portion of Sherwood Park is located across Anthony Henday Drive to the west, between Sherwood Park Freeway and Highway 16. Numerous developments fronting the south side of Wye Road, including Wye Gardens, Wye Crossing, Salisbury Village and the Estates of Sherwood Park, are also within the community. Lands north of Highway 16 and south of Township Road 534/Oldman Creek between Range Road 232 (Sherwood Drive) to the west and Highway 21 to the east are also within the Sherwood Park urban service area.

Originally posted 2019-03-22 10:39:29. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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